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Black Hills



INDIAN AFFAIRS.


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THE ATTACK ON LIEUT. LEMLY'S EXPEDITION MADE BY LAME DEER'S BAND -- AN UNFOUNDED REPORT -- A SIOUX BUFFALO HUNT TO BE FOLLOWED BY A "BIG TALK" AT WASHINGTON.

Reported in The New York Times / August 5, 1877

CHICAGO, Ill., Aug. 4. -- Information of an authentic nature has been received at military head-quarters that it was Lame Deer's band of Sioux Indians which recently attacked the surveying party under Lieut. Lemly on Spearfish Creek. The surveyors are engaged in running a boundary between Nebraska and Wyoming Territory. The supposition that the attacking band were agency Indians proves to be unfounded.

There is a deep-seated conviction in Army circles here that reports sent hither from Montana about an influx of Nez Perces Indians are ingeniously concocted lies, which have been circulated for a purpose. It is soberly doubted whether any of the Indians of that tribe have really crossed the range in Central Montana. The story that they were coming over into that territory to hunt buffalo is pronounced absurd by all who are familiar with the region.

Gen Crook, who is here en route eastward, states that some of the well-conducted Indians who served with the troops last Winter, including Cheyennes, Arapahoes, and Sioux, are about starting on a buffalo hunt toward the Big Horn and Musselshell country under the command of Spotted Tail, who can be trusted to keep them within bounds. After the hunt is over a dozen or so of the chiefs will go to Washington to have a "big talk" over the boundary of the new Missouri Reservation. It is not yet known what Chiefs will compose the delegation.

THE HOSTILITIES IN IDAHO -- FRIENDLY INDIANS ROBBED AND BEATEN BY THE HOSTILES -- CHIEF JOSEPH'S PLANS.

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Aug. 4. -- A dispatch from Lewiston, dated Aug. 1, says: Yesterday Indian Joe and his family, who have been with the people at State Creek all through the Indian troubles, and proved true and faithful to the whites, returned from Kamiah, where they had been sent to ascertain the movements of the hostiles. His squaw says the Indians at Kamiah told her they were going across the mountains by the Lolo trail, with their stock and families, and when they got them into a secure place they would return and fight the soldiers. She also states that before leaving Kamiah they went to the friendly Indian's camp, drove off all the young squaws, beat them with clubs, and forced them along like so many cattle; also came back and robbed them of everything they could find and all their horses of any value. She further stated that the hostiles are to be reinforced by Indians from the other side of the mountains on their return. Her statements are considered trustworthy by those who have known her.

This morning, Lieut. Wilmont, with 30 men, started to cross Salmon River to ascertain if any hostiles remain there. It has been reported for several days that a few had been seen in that direction, and his object is to hunt them out, and destroy all supplies.

Aug. 2. -- It is now believed by old acquaintances of Joseph that he will place his stores and extra horses in safety and return to Camas Prairie by the Elk city or Piette trails, which are much more easily traveled than the Lolo. This trip can be made in about seven days by a forced march. He has asserted his determination to burn the grain on Camas Prairie, and then arrange his plans to go to Willowa, and the opinion is prevalent that he will attempt it.

 

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